collecting things
collecting things
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likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava
"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective. 
His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.
DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”
I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava
1. Man in Window
2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York
3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat
4. Woman on Train
5. Window and Stove
6. Man with Portfolio
7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 
8. Kids God Bless
9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs
10. Hallway
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kristinvicari:

Sophie Turner
 London, July 2014
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austinkleon:

Robert De Niro, Sr. and Virginia Admiral

Did you know Robert De Niro’s parents were both painters who met in art school?

Wikipedia:


  At [Hans] Hofmann’s summer school, [De Niro] met fellow student Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. They surrounded themselves with an illustrious circle of friends, including writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and the actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr., was born in August 1943.


See also: the documentary Remembering The Artist: Robert De Niro, Sr.
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superseventies:

Model Julie Christine wearing Yves Saint Laurent, photographed in her apartment in Rome by David Bailey, September 1975.  
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keyframedaily:

Dustin Hoffman by Terry O’Neill.
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voxsart:

Paris, 1960.
Walkies with Paul Newman, featuring the same style of A-2 suede bomber jacket with varsity collar that he would wear the following year in The Hustler.
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andreii-tarkovsky:


Ingmar Bergman

Happy Birthday to one of the greatest filmmakers! (July 14th 1918 - July 30th - 2007)
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Anna Karina, 1960s.
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retrogasm:

Grace Kelly
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cinemove:


Marnie (1964) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

You don’t love me. I’m just something you’ve caught! You think I’m some sort of animal you’ve trapped!
cinemove:


Marnie (1964) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

You don’t love me. I’m just something you’ve caught! You think I’m some sort of animal you’ve trapped!
cinemove:


Marnie (1964) dir. Alfred Hitchcock

You don’t love me. I’m just something you’ve caught! You think I’m some sort of animal you’ve trapped!